Rev Dr John Zwolanek

Male 1815 - 1890  (74 years)


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  • Name John Zwolanek 
    Prefix Rev Dr 
    Born 13 Aug 1815  Sobinov, Sobinov, Havlickuv Brod, Vysocina, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • near Chotebor
      evangelical church in Krucemburk, Havlickuv Brod
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1854  Fayetteville, Texas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Minister and Physician 
    • http://www.fayettevillebrethrenchurch.org/about-us/history/
      In 1855, a group of Protestant Czech families settled near Fayetteville in Ross Prairie. The settlers had such well-known family names of today as Hruska, Jecmenek, Sebesta, Mikeska and Chupik. Desiring to have Czech worship services, the settlers called upon Rev. John Zvolanek, who lived forty miles away at Austin’s San Felipe-on-the-Brazos. Services were held in the Ross Prairie area in the homes of the settlers, and Rev. Zvolanek’s preaching is recognized as the first Czech Protestant preaching in the state of Texas. In 1874, a church was built on land donated by Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Jecmenek. The approximate cost of constructing the church was $1,200.00. The church was remodeled in 1924, 1957 and 1998. In 1999, the Texas Historical Commission declared the Fayetteville Brethren Cemetery as an Official Historical Texas Cemetery. In 2005, the members held a Sesquicentennial (150 years) Celebration of service to the Savior.
      Pastors Who Have Served:

      1855 - 1859 Rev. John Zvolanek
      -------------------------------------------
      http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fzv01

      Albert J. Blaha, Sr., "ZVOLANEK, JAN," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fzv01), accessed July 15, 2012. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

      ZVOLANEK, JAN (1815–1890). Jan (Johann, John) Zvolanek (Zwolanek), minister and physician, son of Jan and Anna (Kafka) Zvolanek, was born on August 3, 1815, in Sobinov, Bohemia. The Zvolanek family had lived in Sobinov for at least 200 years and were well-to-do members of the Protestant Brethren Church. Zvolanek received his education as a physician in Vienna and, at his mother's insistence, studied theology at Basel. His first church was at Hab_ina. He married Amalia Elizabeth Lojka at Humpolec, southeast of Praha. Their daughter, Julia Johanna, was born at Hab_ina. In 1847 Zvolanek was assigned to the district of Vsetin in Moravia and served the Protestant churches at Usti, Leskovec, Polanka, Hovezi, Halenkow, and Zdechov until 1853. Zvolanek immigrated to Texas, arriving at Galveston with his wife and daughter on the bark Weser on December 3, 1854. They settled at San Felipe, where Zvolanek bought a house and practiced medicine. The Czech-Moravian Brethren Church in Texas was founded and grew under Zvolanek's ministry. In 1855 he was called to serve the Czech and Moravian families at Ross Prairie. He was probably the first minister ever to preach in Czech in Texas, and perhaps in the United States. He also became associated with the Evangelical Lutheran Synod in Texas and preached in German in Lutheran churches. In 1859 the Zvolaneks left Texas and went to Gnadensutter, Ohio, where there was a Moravian church. Then, about 1862, the family moved to Santa Fe, Indiana, and about 1864 to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Zvolanek and his wife were divorced on August 8, 1868. He moved alone to Muscoda and the Blue River valley, where he served the Czech Evangelical Church. There, on November 19, 1879, he married Mary Schafer, a former patient of his some forty years his junior. They had four sons. Reverend Zvolanek died in 1890 and is buried in the Blue River Church Cemetery near Muscoda, Wisconsin. His second wife died on December 23, 1914.

      BIBLIOGRAPHY:

      Christian Sisters Union Study Committee, Unity of the Brethren in Texas, 1855–1966 (Taylor, Texas: Unity of the Brethren, 1970). Jan Habenicht, D_jiny _echuv americk_ch (St. Louis: Hlas, 1910). Estelle Hudson and Henry R. Maresh, Czech Pioneers of the Southwest (Dallas: South-West, 1934).

      Albert J. Blaha, Sr.
      ---------------------------------------------------------
      http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txaustin/Czech/History/Migration_11_19.html

      The following was published as the lead article in Volume I of a series of books published by the Texas Czech Genealogical Society in 2005 and 2007 titled “Czech Family Histories.”

      AN ACCOUNT

      OF

      THE FIRST GROUP MIGRATIONS OF CZECHS TO TEXAS

      by

      James Woodrick

      pages 11 - 19

      Later in 1854 the “WESER” brought another group of Czech and Polish families to Texas, landing in Galveston on December 3. Czechs included Franz Blaha and family, Ferd. Dubsky, Maria Kotulla, Jan Kovajan and family, Franz Maniko, Jos. Matchotka, Franz Strade and John Zvolanek, his wife Amalia and daughter. Zvolanek was an ordained minister and a medical doctor. He first settled in San Falipe where he practiced medicine. In 1855 he began serving the early Protestant Czech settlers of the Ross Prairie (near Frelsburg) area as their preacher, leading certainly the first services spoken in Czech in Texas and perhaps the U.S.A. The Polish families founded the town of Panna Maria in Karnes County.
    Migration 3 Dec 1854  Humpolec, Humpolec, Pelhrimov, Vysocina, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Immigration 3 Dec 1854  PORT, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • Ancestry.com
      Passenger and Immigration Lists Index 1500-1900s
      Name: Joh Zvolanek
      Year: 1854
      Place: Galveston, Texas
      Family Members: family
      Source Publication Code: 205
      Primary Immigrant: Zvolanek, Joh
      Source Bibliography: BACA, LEO. Czech Immigration Passenger Lists. Hallettsville, Tex.: Old Homestead Publishing Co. Vol. 1. 1983. 158p.
      Page: 62

      www.cgsi.org
      Surname: ZVOLANEK - from Leo Baca's Czech immigration passenger lists
      First Name: Johann
      Alternate Surname: ZWOLLANECK
      Notes: The Reverend
      Other Family Members: and family
      Departure City: Humpoletz
      Departure Country: Bohemia
      Ship: Weser
      Arrival Date: 3 December 1854
      Arrival Port: Galveston
      Volume: 1
      ----------------------------------------------
      http://treeclimbingwithsonja.blogspot.com/2011/02/galveston-german-newspaper-immmigration.html

      Galveston German newspaper Immigration List Transcription

      Source: Galveston Zeitung: 9 Dec. 1854

      3 Dec. 1854 from Bremen, Bark Weser

      Zwolaneck, Johann (F) from Humpoletz

      Kooygan, Jann (F) from Humpoletz

      Malcholka, Joseph (F) from Humpoletz

      Blaha, Franz (F) from Humpoletz

      Dubsky, Ferdinand from Humpoletz

      Maniko, Franz from Humpoletz

      Skwortz, Joseph (F) from Himmelwitz

      Kotulla, Maria from Himmelwitz

      Krawitz, Leopold from Himmelwitz
    Occupation 1864  New Berlin, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Minister 
    • pastor at Old German Reformed Church in New Berlin, Waukesha County, Wisconsin 1864-1865; came from Indiana

      http://www.newberlinhistoricalsociety.org/the-landmarks-commission/german-evangelical-protestant-cemetary/pioneer-history
      German Evangelical Protestant Cemetary
      Pioneer History

      by Laurie DeMoss and Sue Hemman
      New Berlin Landmark Commission

      The first German church in New Berlin was Lutheran and this cemetery is the only evidence still remaining. Many of New Berlin's early pioneers were industrious, thrifty German settlers, educated in German and bilingual in English, with the ability to pay in cash for land and stock.

      When Frederick William III, ruler of Prussia, issued a decree to unite the Lutherans and the Reformed into one evangelical congregation, the forced Prussian Union caused many Lutherans to immigrate to America to seek freedom of worship. The first group of Protestant Germans arrived from Rhenish-Bavaria in 1840 led by Christian Damm, his wife Margaret (Wagner) Korn Damm and her sons Jacob and Henry Korn, along with Jacob's wife Katherine (Eiler) Korn. Christian Damm's family built a log cabin on the west side of Racine Ave. JacobKorn's family settled at the comer of Racine Ave. and Observatory Rd. Henry Korn's family later settled on Observatory Rd., near Woelfel Rd. In 1841, Henry Luke and Philip Strieder (Streeter) arrived. Henry Luke married Margaret, a daughter of Christian and Margaret Damm and settled along Racine Ave. east of and including the Little Grove School area at Swartz Rd. In 1842 the Kerns arrived from Hesse-Darmstadt and in 1843 the Swartzes and Grasers came from Bavaria and Alsace. George Sittel and his wife Anna arrived in New Berlin from New York in 1851, settling along Coffee Rd. Their headstones are among the very few still left standing in the cemetery.

      It was in 1842 that those first Germans gathered in Christian Damm's log house to organize their church congregation led by a Lutheran pastor, the Rev. Friedrich Schmidt of Daldorf, Wuerrtemberg, Germany, who was a circuit-riding preacher. The first burial was that same year - Barbara Luke, 13 days old who died of convulsions. A few years after Pastor Schmidt moved to Michigan in 1844, Pastor Johannes Weinmann of Bemhagen, Wuerrtemberg, Germany was called to minister to the German settlers in New Berlin. It appears that Christian Damm, who had an original land grant along Racine Ave., donated the land for the cemetery and the first frame church that was built in 1848 and dedicated in 1849. In 1852 Christian Damm sold additional land to the congregation for $25. The first child baptized was George Wagner, born April 29,1850, son of Peter and Mary (Sittel) Wagner. The parsonage was erected by 1852 and a parochial school taught by the pastor was established. Johan K. Meidenbauer was the first secretary and historian of the church. Initially he listed 26 contributing families as members. Within three years this list had grown to 42 families.

      Subsequent pastors were Pastor Daniel Huber, 1860-1863, Pastor John Zwolanek, 1864-1865 and Pastor Bartelt-1866. Doctrinal differences led to the breakup of the church in the late 1860s. A majority of the congregation wished to leave the Lutherans and form a German Reformed church, echoing the issues that had originally caused the Germans to seek religious freedom in America many years before. The founders of the new church were Jacob Wagner, Daniel Schley, Philip Streeter and Abraham Kem. Initially the new German Reformed group met in the Little Grove School.In 1865 Jacob Korn deeded land to the trustees about a half-mile north of their former church near Racine and Swartz Rd. A brick church was built there in 1865 at a cost of $800. A cemetery was dedicated at the new site and as the old Lutheran church was abandoned after 1867, the original Lutheran cemetery became nearly forgotten, overgrown and neglected.

      Pioneer life was difficult and filled with hardships. Disease, illness and accidents were daily occurrences. Of the 93 interments in this cemetery, 65 were infants or children. As was mentioned, the first burial was a baby of Henry and Barbara Luke. Sadly, they buried a second newborn daughter in 1846, a 13 day old son in 1847, an 18 day old son in 1849, an 11 day old son in 1850, a 13 week old daughter in 1851 and a 10 week old son in 1858. Just as sad are the losses of Christoph and Margareth Krainer. They buried a 9 month old son in 1859, then between July 4 and July 14, 1863 they lost a 17 month old, a 6 year old and a 4 year old to throat angina. In 1865 another 13 month old son died. J.K. Meidenbauer and his wife Catherine had only one child. It was stillborn and is listed on the cemetery record, but they chose to bury the infant near a pine tree on their farm.

      Information for this history has been gathered from these sources:"German Pioneers of New Berlin" by J.H.A. Lacker; "History of St. John's Oakwood Evangelical Lutheran Church"; "Not as German as You'd Think" by Mary Ella Milham; collection of New Berlin Almanacks; New Berlin Citizen, 4/87, and Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod records.

      http://www.welshistory.org/home/180009847/180009847/180071961/J%20V17%202.pdf
      Proceedings of the 14th Convention of the German Evengelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin and Other States held in the First German Evangical Lutheran Congregation in Manitowoc, Wisc. Watertown 1864
      May 17, 1864
      IV. Arrival of New Preachers, Ordination and Installation
      On May 7 Pastor Zwolanek arrived here from Indiana and accepted a call from the congregationin New Berlin which had been orphaned since the depature of Pastor Huber.

      http://www.welshistory.org/home/180009847/180009847/180071961/Vol18No1.pdf
      Proceedings of the 14th Convention of the German Evengelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin and Other States held in the First German Evangelical Lutheran Congregation in Manitowoc, Wisc. Watertown
      May 28, 1864

      30 that it could not recommend the acceptance of Pastor Zwolanek until he rereives a release from the Kirchen = Verein des Westens (Church Association of the West - a United Church type of synod);


      http://www.welshistory.org/home/180009847/180009847/180071961/Vol15No1.pdf
      Proceedings of the 15th Convention of the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin and Other States held in the German Evangelical Lutheran Church of Watertown, Wis. June 22 to 28 1865 Watertown
      The matter of the congregation in New Berlin was now brought up for discussion. The repected Pastor Wagner presented the report, Pastor Zwolanek enlarged upon it. After the statement of the former, a change in pastors would seem to be the answer. The convention, however, cannot as in other cases order what appears to be best, but can only give counsel. The convention, however, did resolve, in case Pastor Zwolanek leaves the congregation, the neighboring pastors would serve the vacancy in New Berlin with word and sacrament.

      http://www.welshistory.org/home/180009847/180009847/180071961/J%20V18%202.pdf
      Proceedings of the Sixteenth Convention of the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Wisconsin and Other States held in the German Evangelical Lutheran Congregation in Fond du Lac, Wisc. from June 7 to 13, 1866
      Depature of Pastors
      2. Pastor Zwolaneck, who is not a member of our synod, likewise left the congregation in New Berlin and stated at the same time that he was leaving the preaching ministry. As far as I know, he has done this.


    1870 US Census 1870  Blue River, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    • Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Blue River, Grant, Wisconsin; Roll: M593_1716; Page: 42A; Image: 88; Family History Library Film: 553215.
      Ancestry.com
      John Zwolanck
      Note: clergyman living with W Junck family

      FamilySearch.org
      Name: John Zwolanek
      Estimated Birth Year: 1815
      Gender: Male
      Age in 1870: 55y
      Color (white, black, mulatto, chinese, Indian): White
      Birthplace: Bohemia
      Home in 1870: Wisconsin, United States
      Household Gender Age
      W Janik M 27y
      Emma Janik F 21y
      Jule Janik M 3y
      John Zwolanek M 55y
    Occupation 1870  Blue River, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Minister 
    • http://www.bluerivervalleychurch.org/history.html
      Foundations of the Czech Community
      The Bohemians who founded the Blue River Valley Church
      arrived in the area in the early 1860's. Most of the settlers were
      farmers in Bohemia and they continued to till the soil for a livelihood
      when they settled here and became two communities - the
      "southern group" and the "northern group." The family names
      of many of these immigrants are still heard in southwestern
      Wisconsin

      Worship Before Construction of Church Buildings
      Like the first century church, the early pioneers used their homes as places of worship until the first church building was erected in 1868. Joseph Dvorak's home was the first to host such a gathering. There they read from their prayer book and scripture from the Bible. Having no pastor to deliver sermons they relied upon readings from the Postilla, a compilation of published sermons. The farmers wanted a Czech pastor, but Czech ministers were scarce. Moreover, the depressed economic conditions that followed on the heels of the Civil War increased the difficulties in supporting a resident pastor.
      Although the community lacked a pastor, they were able to rely on the visits of itinerant ministers. During the early years sympathetic Czech ministers from throughout the Midwest came to serve the small transplanted piece of Bohemia. They came from Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, and Cedar Rapids.
      A service with a minister was not a weekly event, but it was indeed a major event. With poor roads and often oxen-drawn vehicles, many spent nearly an entire Sunday going to and from the homes hosting the worship services. Despite the lack of local pastors, both the northern and southern valley communities decided to undertake the construction of church buildings.

      http://www.bluerivervalleychurch.org/history2.html

      The Reformed Church
      The first was the "Reformed Church" building built in 1868 by the southern group on Joseph Dvorak's land near the site of the old Kolman flour and feed mill. The mill was located on the Six Mile Branch of the Blue River just south of the present intersection of County Highway "Q" and Stanek Road. The church building was a log structure twenty-four feet long by sixteen feet wide by ten feet high. Although no photographs or drawings of the log church have been preserved, an earlier history described it as being built in the style typical of Bohemian log buildings with a whitewashed exterior and widely extended roof overhangs at the gables. It had rough hewn board benches for pews and a plain board altar.

      The Lutheran Church
      In the following year, 1869, the northern group erected a white frame structure approximately a mile and a half to the north. The site is on the grounds where the current Blue River Valley Church building
      stands. This frame building was known as the "Lutheran Church " and was situated approximately two hundred feet to the northeast of the main entry of the current building.
      The Lutheran congregation purchased forty acres of land from Joseph Novak (a founder of the Reformed Church) with the intent of reserving a sizable portion of it for a
      cemetery. The cemetery was fenced off immediately to the southeast of the frame church. In this church yard are buried the earliest Czech pioneers of this region, with the first burial that of Jan Kolman in1870. As the years passed, many of the Czech community came to find their resting place there. There are few families of Czech heritage in the area that cannot trace at least a distant relative to the Blue River Valley Church Cemetery.

      http://www.bluerivervalleychurch.org/history3.html
      A Pastor Arrives
      In 1870, Dr. John Zvolanek from Texas was invited to be the pastor of the new Lutheran Church. One his most attractive attributes to the community was that he was willing to serve at a meager salary. Besides being a trained and experienced minister, he was also a physician. He was described as having "a strong and courageous character," and was "a good organizer and efficient leader."
      According to Joseph Frank Machotka in his history of 1935, "He quickly realized that these two little church groups should make one congregation because they represented one faith, spoke one and the same language, and in truth had been neighbors in old Bohemia and were neighbors here."

      Creation of the Bohemian Evangelical Church
      After discussing it with the members of the Boards of Trustees of both churches, Rev. Zvolanek proposed on Sunday, May 22, 1870, immediately following a joint service of both congregations in the Lutheran Church, that the Reformed Church and the Lutheran Church should unite as a single church and congregation. After a short discussion, an agreement was drawn up creating the "Ceska Evangelicha Cirkev" (The Bohemian Evangelical Church). This document became the first and most important document in the history of the church. The agreement was written in the Czech language and many of the signatures were made in the old Slavic and German script.
      Rev. Zvolanek served the church for ten years after the consolidation. For forty-four years the frame church, built in 1869 served the congregation and the descendants of the signatories.

      Building the "New" Brick Church Building
      Since by 1913 the church membership had outgrown the capacity of the old frame
      building, the present brick structure was erected. The new building was made possible
      through the generous contributions of the members of the church and its friends in the
      area with a total of $4,000 given.
      Many members of the church gave numerous days of labor in excavation or construction of the building. Their hard work and planning held the entire cost of the construction to $4,000. When the new building was dedicated in November of 1913, the Bohemian heritage of the church was obvious with the program for the event printed in both the Czech and English languages.

      http://www.bluerivervalleychurch.org/history4.html
      Change of Name
      Some time during the twenty-six years of ministry of Rev. Joseph Misicka (1909-1935), the name of the church was changed from the "Ceska Evangelicka Cirkev" to the "Blue River Valley Church." The new name was chosen to be more symbolic of the community it serves.

      Annual Homecoming Instituted
      On the last Sunday in June 1930, the custom of the Annual Blue River Valley Church Homecoming and Reunion was established. Not only is the event a time of reunion, but also a time to reach out to new friends. Homecoming has for decades featured guest speakers and special music during services in both the morning and afternoon. A huge midday potluck picnic has become an institution for the time between the services. The most important culinary duty assigned to anyone at the picnic has become that of the "Official Homecoming Lemonade Master." To partake of homecoming lemonade has been characterized by some as one of the greatest "blessings" of homecoming, so its concoction has been traditionally entrusted to only the eldest male members of the congregation.

      The Sixty-Fifth Anniversary
      By the time the sixty-fifth anniversary of the church was celebrated on 30 June 1935, a number of milestones had been reached. Despite trying social changes and a debilitating economic depression, the church saw steady growth in membership and a developing spirituality. Gradually the older Czech people had been passing on and their descendants inter-marrying with the non-Czech Americans to whom the Czech language was foreign. Slowly the order of service changed from Czech to English.

      The Little Church in the Valley
      At the One Hundredth Anniversary, held in June of 1970, there were still a lot of the older members of the church who spoke and understood the Bohemian language of their parents and grandparents. They continued to make the old Czech foods and bring them to the church dinners. Most of the names on the church membership lists were of Czech origin.
      In the years since then, much of what was Bohemian has faded. New limbs and branches have sprouted from these old Bohemian roots and different "American" shoots with dissimilar origins and traditions also have been grafted onto the old trunk. This tree bears a rich diversity of fruit for the Lord and will continue to thrive and be bountiful as it is fed with the Word, watered with Love, warmed by the light of the Spirit, protected from the weeds and vines of ungodly influence and given room to grow.

    Book 1875 
    • http://books.google.com/books?id=MybPAAAAMAAJ&dq=%22pastor+zvolanek%22&source=gbs_navlinks_s

      The Christian World, Volume 26
      American and Foreign Christian Union., 1875 Missions
      page 29
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek.
      Rev. J. Zvolanek, our newly-appointed Bohemian Missionary in Muscoda, Wis, and surrounding country, makes the following report for November:
      "During the month, we had two meetings of special interest - the celebration of the anniversary of the Reformation and Thanksgiving. The congregations were large and the services profitable. We felt thankful to God for that great event, which gave birth to Protestantism. May the glorious truth of justification by faith, which the Reformation enforced, be heard anad accepted by all my countrymen!
      "The mission school is regularly attended by the few children who live near. Those residing at a distance can only come occasionally in the winter. The people are visited regularly, and your monthly, Hlas Praxdy, distributed among them. We cannot find a place for our week-day school, and must abandon it until a parsonage is built. For this purpose we need means. Contributions for benevolent purposes come in slowly, no doubt, on account of the poor harvest. May the Lord bless the efforts of your society in behalf of the Bohemians."
      page 58
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek.
      Our Bohemian Missionary in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, Reb. J. Zvolanek, sends this report for December:
      "On third Advent Sunday we had an interesting baptismal service. The father of the child is an evangelical German, while the mother is a Bohemian Catholic. Frequently I am called to officiate for my countrymen, who, though nominally Roman Catholics, are in reality infidels. The mothers are more inclined to religion than the fathers. Hence I am often invited to baptize their children.
      "At funerals, which are largely attended, I have a good opportunity to reach those who seldom go to the house of God. Many pretned to deny a future life, but when death invades their families, and removes loved ones, they talk differently.
      "The Mission School is continually progressing, and the children are learning rapidly. We are now building a parsonage, in which we will hold a day school. Our congregations remain good. At the request of Dr. Fairall, the Superintendent of Home Missions, I am assisting him in the editing of the Has Praxdy, your Bohemian monthly at Iowa City, Iowa. May God bless your Socity in its work amony my countrymen."
      page 90
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek.
      Rev. J. Zvolanek, our Bohemian Missionary in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, makes this report for the month of January:
      "The religious interest in our congretation is increasing. The membership is not large, but active. We feel the necessity of earnest effort in order to reach the Bohemian popultaion around us. The masses seem to be indifferent on the subject of religion. Having renounced Romanism, they have gone to the other extreme of infidelity. But, if we can only persuade them to read the Bible anc accept Christ as their Saviour, they will make devoted Christians.
      "During the month, I have visited a large number of families, and distributed literature adapted to their condition. It is encouraging to notice how eagerly they read the tracts which are given to them. These little messengers speak to them after the missionary is gone. The children are especially interested in the 'Pritel Ditek' - the pictorial monthly published in Bohemia. It is full of interesting articles, calculated to attract and impress the young. How anxious I am to bring the Bohemian children under proper religious influences before infidelity is instilled into their minds by their skeptical parents."
      page 122
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J Zvolanek.
      Our Bohemian Missionary, Rev. J. Zvolanek, who labors in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, sends this report for the month of February:
      "At our recent communion service there were fifty-three, who commemorated the death and sufferings of our Saviour. The occasion was one of great interest, and contributed to the spiritual advancement of the Church. Even outsiders were deeply impressed, and my prayer is that many may be brought to Christ.
      "Since my last report, two children have been baptized. The Sabbath-school is not so well attended, on account of the sever weather, but hose who come are profited. It encourages me to notive the precious children studying the Bible, and learning about that Saviour, who loved them and gave himself for them. The system of catechising, which I adopt, enforces the teachings of God's word, and impresses the truth upon the minds of the children.
      "During the month, a large numger of families have been visited, and religious services held. While there are many discouragements in this work among the Bohemians, yet I toil on, remembering that they which 'sow in tears shall reap in joy.'
      "We are preparing to build a parsonage and school-house. Some of the timber is on the ground; but we are seriously embarrassed for want of sufficient funds. We hope to receive some assistance from abroad."
      page 151
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek.
      Our Bohemian Missionary, Rev. J. Zvolanek, who labors in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, sends this report for the month of March:
      "It is an encouraging fact that our Sabbath congregations continue to increase. Frequently Bohemian Roman Catholics come in and listen attentively to the preaching of the Gospel. When I discover them in the audience, I endeavor to adapt my remarks to their peculiar state of mind. I ti snot my purpose to openly attack the errors of the Romish system, but rather to hold up the truth, which will overthrow the wrong. The power of Christ to save is
      page 152
      a theme in which I delight. It affords me joy to present Jesus as the great High Priest, who alone can absolve the penitent. While I direct the attention of Rome's deluded followers to the atonement of Christ, I often observe the moistened eye and serious coutenance.
      "About fifty families have been visited with good results. With the permission of the parents, I read and expound the Bible to the children, selecting such passages as are adapted to their condition. Many seem to be hungry for the Bread of Life. May the Holy Spirit make the truth effectual!
      "The Mission-school grows in interest. The classes are full, and the order excellent. The prospect for an increased attendance this Summer is cheering. Pray for us that we may be 'steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord.'"
      page 190
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J Zvolanek.
      Our Bohemian Missionary, Rev. J. Zvolanek, who is laboring in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, sends this report for the month of April:
      "The work of personal visitation has been faithfully attended to. Witn all, the discouragements connected with it, it is pleasnat to go from house to house and talk to the families about religion. They can be more readily approached in their own homes. This is especially true of people, who come to this country from foreign lands. Being cast among strangers, and speaking a different language, they appreciate the visits of those who belong to the same race. The Bohemians, for example, have strong national prejudices.
      "One of the great obstacles to be removed in working successfully among the Bohemains is formalism. They have been instructed to believe that religion consisted in the observance of rites and ceremonies. Hence it is difficutlt to dissipate this error, and lead them into the tnjoyments of a spiritual life. But the Word has given me some success in this unpromising field, and many who fed on the dry husks of mere profession, are now partaking of the bread of life.
      "My sympathies go out in behalf of my countrymen, who are blinded by
      page 191
      the superstitions of Romanism. How anxious I feel concerning their spiritual condition. If they could only have the privilege of reading God's truth, and were made acquainted with the plan of salvation by faith in Christ, they would not long remain in the 'Mother Church.' It seems to me that Protestants should study the peculiar characteristics of Roman Catholics, and learn the best methods of reaching them.
      "During the month my congregations were large, and some interest was manifested. The mission-school continues to prosper. Almost one hundred families have been visited, religious literature distributed, and I trust, much good accomplished.
      page 218
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J Zvolanek.
      Our Bohemian Missionary, Rev. J. Zvolanek, who labors in Mucsoda, Wislk and surrounding country, sends this report for the month of May:
      "One of the great difficulties to be overcome in this work among the Bohemians is indifference. There is not a bitter oppostion to evangelical religion, bur rather a disposition to ignore all kinds of religion. In our native land we were compelled to support the State Church, but in this free country the Bohemians go to the other extreme, and too generally repudiate all churches. It is my aim to show them that Protestantism tolerates freedom of opion and action, and, above all, delivers men from the bondage of sin.
      "in addition to presenting the truth to them from the pulpit, I go to the homes of the people. They are approachable there and, by awakening a sympathy, I can induce some to come to
      page 219
      church on the Sabbath. The priests watch me closely and endeavor to prevent their members from hearing the truth, but many of these Roman Catholics begin to see the folly of being ruled by one man. Hence they do not go to the confessional as often as they have been accustomed. Among the nenety families visited the past month, several interesting cases were found indicating that Roman Catholics may be lifted into a higher and purer life by the use of Gospel instrumentalities; not only the salvation of souls, but the safety of our free institutions depend upon the success of Portestant Christians in enlightening and evangelizing the large foreign Romish element now growing so rapidly in thes country. As I understand it, this is the work that the 'American and Foreign Christian Union' proposes to do. It can not be accomplished too soon."
      page 254
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J Zvolanek.
      Rev. J. Zvolanek, our Bohemian Missionary, in Muscoda and surrounding country, writes thus concerning his labors for the month of June:
      "The work of the Lord continues to advance, notwithstanding the opposition of the Romish priests. They are active and vigilent, and do all they can to prevent the spread of the truth but we are not without evidences of the good results of our efforts. The fact is, that while the people outwardly conform to the requirements ot eh Romish system, many of them have misgivings about the efficacy of their pompous ceremonial. If the real desires of their hearts could be known, we should find a want of sympathy for so much formalism. This is especially true of those who have become somewhat enlightened. It is my aim to find these cases, and I have succeded beyond my expectations.
      "The bitter opposition of the Romish power to our free schools is opening the eyes of many thinking Roman Catholics, and I use this argument to show them the the Jesuits are hostile to education. The Bohemian children attend our public schools, and , should the priests endeavor to remove them, the parents will resist, even if they are excluded from the sacraments of the 'Mother Church."
      "In my regular monthly calls I have given special attention to Bible reading, tract distribution, and prayer. At the same time, I catechise the children, and urge upon them the duty of serving the Lord in sincerity and truth. In this department of pastoral work I take a deep interest, because there is a good indication of favorable results.
      "Th congregations remain full, though the weather has been oppressively warm. Pray for us, that we may be steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord."
      page 307
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek
      Rev. J. Zvolanek, our Bohemian Missionary, in Muscoda and surrounding country, writes as follows of his work for the month of August:
      "There is a bitter feeling between the Bohemians and Germans in the Romish Church of this place. The priest is a German, and the Bohemian part of the congregation desire one of their own nationality. They threaten to secede and establish a society of their own. In the meantime, they call upon me to baptize their children and bury their dead. This indicates that they are not very strict Romanists. All they do is simply the observance of a few outward forms. They are friendly to me, and I believe that many of them will be reached. The great difficulty is their intense worldly spirit, but the Gospel is able to subdue even that.
      "Th harvest season has interfered with my work. there are about thirty families in my society , and they are principally farmers. Hence they have not been so regular in ther attendance
      page 308
      at church as at other times. The same cause has affected the mission school.
      "The parsonage and school house have been completed, and we have taken possession of them. These improvements will strengthen our mission. To God be all the praise!"
      page 347
      Muscoda, Wis. - Rev. J. Zvolanek
      Rev. J. Zvolanek, our Bohemain Missionary, in Muscoda, Wis., and surrounding country, sends this report for the month of September:
      "Th cool pleasnat weather has increased the number of worshipers in the sanctuary. Harvest is over, and our country members are more regular in their attendance. There is evidently an improvement in the religious condition of our congregation. It has been my aim to preach practical sermons, and urge upon my people the importance of being fully consecrated to the work of the Lord. If they were less formal and more spiritual, we certainly would behold more sinners converted to God.
      "In my pastoral visits I call upon many families who seldom attend any church. When permitted, I pray with them and talk to them of Christ. Some appear to be serious, and desire me to come again. The women are more inclined to accept the truth than the men. Those who are Roman Catholics know more about the Virgin than the Son.
      page 348
      The Holy Spirit seems to be moving upon the hearts of the people.
      "Our Mission School is filling up, and I am devoting special attention to the dear children."
    Book 1877 
    1880 US Census 1880  Muscoda, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Muscoda, Grant, Wisconsin; Roll: 1427; Family History Film: 1255427; Page: 266C; Enumeration District: 119; .
      Ancestry.com
      John Zwolanck
    Book 1881 
    • History of Grant County, Wisconsin
      by C. W. Butterfield ... et al.
      page 972
      John Zwolanek, physician and minister, Muscoda; was born in Bohemia in 1815, and educated in a literary course, in Hungary, and graduated in medicine at Vienna. He practiced medicine eleven years in the old country, and came to America in 1853, and located at St. Philip, Texas, where he remained five years, and he followed his profession, that of minister and physician; then he came to Port Washington, Ohio, where he pursued his vocation four years; from there he went to Indiana, where he remained two years and then came to Fond du Lac, this State, and from there to Muscoda in 1868, where he has remained and pursued his vocation to the present time.

      http://openlibrary.org/books/OL24156243M/History_of_Grant_County_Wisconsin

      http://archive.org/details/cu31924028871494
    Buried 1890  CEMETERY Blue River Valley Church, Muscoda, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Death Civil State 15 Jan 1890  Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    • Ancestry.com
      Wisconsin Deaths 1820-1907
      Name: Joh Zwolanek
      Death Date: 15 Jan 1890
      County: Grant
      Volume: 01
      Page #: 0291
      Reel: 030
      Image: 1252
      ImageNum: 105990
      Sequence #: 435154
      Level Info: Wisconsin Vital Records Death Index.

      FamilySearch.org
      Name: John Zwolanek
      Gender: Male
      Burial Date:
      Burial Place:
      Death Date: 15 Jan 1890
      Death Place: Castle Rock, Grant, Wis.
      Age: 74
      Birth Date: 03 Aug 1815
      Birthplace: Europe
      Occupation: Preacher & Doctor
      Race: White
      Marital Status: Married
      Spouse's Name: Mary A. Zwolanek
      Father's Name:
      Father's Birthplace:
      Mother's Name:
      Mother's Birthplace:
      Indexing Project (Batch) Number: B06547-0
      System Origin: Wisconsin-EASy
      Source Film Number: 1310185
      Reference Number: vol 1
    Died 15 Jan 1890  Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Book 1907 
    • http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/texasczech/Brethren/Church%20History%20by%20Chlumsky.pdf
      History of the Evangelic Union of the Bohemian Moravian Brethren in Texas
      by Rev. A. Chlumsky 1907
      Translated from the Bohemain language by Miss Annie A. Juren
      page 17 and 18
      ter about a half again Were Germans.
      The over population of these countries and the national
      oppression, unfriendly feeling toward the Slaves, was the
      cause already in the second half of the last century of a
      strong immigration, which at first turned to Russia; but
      when the religious intolerance of that empire was noticed and
      experienced, the emigration truned to the United States, The first
      considerable influx of emigrants to America, consisted chiefly
      of fugitives of the Revolution Period of 1848' they were fol-
      lowed later by a poorer class seeking homesteads and lands for
      cultivation. Emigrants from Bohemia and western part of Moravia
      settled chiefly in the northern part of the United States' while
      those of eastern Moravia nearly exclusively turned to Texas. The
      first Bohemian Evangelical sermon in Texas was preached by
      pastor John Zvolanek at Fayetteville A. D. 1855. He disappeared,
      however, without having organized any congregations at all. The
      oldest congregation in Texas was organized by Rev. Joseph
      Opocensky 1865 in Wesley, Texas, who immigrated with this
      people 1858 from Moravia and died in Wesley, Texas 1870.
    Name Jan Zvolanek 
    Custom ID Zwolanek J1 
    Person ID I3189  Czech
    Last Modified 14 Dec 2014 

    Father Jan Zwolanek,   b. 19 Dec 1783, Sobinov, Sobinov, Havlickuv Brod, Vysocina, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother Anna Kafka,   b. 6 Mar 1784, Slavetin, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1070  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Amelia Alzbeta Lojka,   b. 23 Sep 1822, Hruba Vrbka #117, Hodonin, Jihomoravsky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1899, Gladstone, Delta County, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 6 Aug 1844  CHURCH Protestant Augsburg Confession Church, Humpolec, Pelhrimov, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Divorced 3 Aug 1868 
    Children 
    +1. Julia Johanna Zwolanek,   b. 13 Jun 1845, Habina #50, Ustek, Litomerice, Ustecky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1916  (Age 70 years)
    Last Modified 24 Sep 2016 
    Family ID F1071  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mary A Shafer,   b. 8 May 1855, Castle Rock, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Dec 1914  (Age 59 years) 
    Married 19 Nov 1879  Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Marriage Civil State 19 Nov 1879  Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Ancestry.com
      Wisconsin Marriages 1835-1900
      Name: John Zwolanek
      Spouse: Mary A. Schaefer
      Marriage Date: 19 Nov 1879
      County: Grant
      State: WI
    Children 
    +1. John Zwolanek,   b. 3 Mar 1880, Muscoda, Blue River, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1951  (Age 70 years)
    +2. Joseph Zwolanek,   b. 24 Dec 1881, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Jan 1944, Winnebago County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
    +3. Otto Zwolanek,   b. 6 Jan 1884, Castle Rock, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1957, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
    +4. Emil Gustaf Adolph Zwolanek,   b. 2 Apr 1886, Castle Rock, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Aug 1952  (Age 66 years)
    Last Modified 5 Jul 2012 
    Family ID F1072  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 13 Aug 1815 - Sobinov, Sobinov, Havlickuv Brod, Vysocina, Czech Republic Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Minister and Physician - 1854 - Fayetteville, Texas, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMigration - 3 Dec 1854 - Humpolec, Humpolec, Pelhrimov, Vysocina, Czech Republic Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 3 Dec 1854 - PORT, Galveston, Galveston County, Texas, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Minister - 1864 - New Berlin, Waukesha County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1870 US Census - 1870 - Blue River, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Minister - 1870 - Blue River, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 19 Nov 1879 - Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarriage Civil State - 19 Nov 1879 - Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1880 US Census - 1880 - Muscoda, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 1890 - CEMETERY Blue River Valley Church, Muscoda, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeath Civil State - 15 Jan 1890 - Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Jan 1890 - Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S175] PORT IMMIGRATION Galveston, Texas, USA.

    2. [S352] CENSUS USA 1870.

    3. [S354] CENSUS USA 1880.

    4. [S556] CEMETERY Blue River Valley Church Cemetery, Muscoda, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA.

    5. [S298] STATE INDEX Death - Wisconsin - 1820 - 1907.

    6. [S652] CHURCH Protestant Augsburg Confession Church, Humpolec, Pelhrimov, Czech Republic, USA.