Jan Beranek

Male 1844 - 1939  (95 years)


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  • Name Jan Beranek  [1, 2
    Born 16 Apr 1844  Bratcice #54, Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • 24 Apr 1844
    Gender Male 
    Migration 1863  Bratcice, Bratcice, Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Immigration 1863 
    1870 US Census 1870  Township 17, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Source Citation: Year: 1870; Census Place: Township 17, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: M593_833; Page: 317B; Image: 114; Family History Library Film: 552332.
      Ancestry.com
      John Beranch
    1880 US Census 1880  Douglas, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    • Source Citation: Year: 1880; Census Place: Douglas, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: 756; Family History Film: 1254756; Page: 371B; Enumeration District: 182; Image: 0033.
      Ancestry.com
      John Baronick
    1900 US Census 1900  Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    • Source Citation: Year: 1900; Census Place: Morse Bluff, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: 939; Page: 2B; Enumeration District: 128; FHL microfilm: 1240939.
      Ancestry.com
      John Beranek
    1910 US Census 1910  Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Ancestry.com
      John Beranek
      Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Bohemia, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: T624_855; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 0135; Image: 45; FHL microfilm: 1374868.
    1920 US Census 1920  Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • Ancestry.com
      Jan Bernanek
      Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Bohemia, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: T625_1001; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 145; Image: 49.
    1930 US Census 1930  Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • Ancestry.com
      John Beranek
      Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Bohemia, Saunders, Nebraska; Roll: 1292; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 3; Image: 644.0; FHL microfilm: 2341027.
    Death Civil State 1939  Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Notes
    • http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/7052711/person/-1168684881/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum

      Jan Beranek was my great grandfather, I'm told that he became a mean man after a high fever that changed his personality.

      Jan and Albina Beranek {my great grandparents}

      Beranek is the Czech word for "lamb". During the compilation of this biography, the names of many Beraneks were encountered. The earliest record found was of a Frank Beranek who with his wife and six children arrived in New York on 4 November 1853 aboard the ship HERSCHEL from Hamburg. Their home was listed as having been Pisek, Bohemia.

      A passenger list index on microfilm, of immigrants aboard ships arriving at Baltimore from 1820 through 1897, listed several dozen Beraneks. Vaclav's name was not found. This may have been either because of the poor quality of the film {many entries wer illegible}, or because the list was incomplete.

      The LaCrosse {Wisconsin} Tribune and Leader Press for 15 April 1935, listed the obituary of Joseph Beranek, born 2 January 1834 in Czechoslovakia. He was survied by two sons, Joseph and John of LaCrosse; and six daughters, Mrs. D.Troyanek, Mrs. Charles Zink, Mrs. Albert Lerkie, and Mrs. Arthur Land of LaCrosse; Mrs. Hugo Kerty of Colorado; Mrs. Kent Wilson of Covington, Kentucky; and one sister, Mrs. Mary Frisch of Chipmunk Ridge near Stoddard, Wisconsin.

      The book HISTORY OF CZECHS IN NEBRASKA, by Rose Rosicky, mentions a John Beranek who came to Pawnee county in 1867 and a S.A. Beranek who lived in Omaha in the late 1880's The name was also found listed in the phone directories of several cities. No serious attempt was made to determine in what way, if any, the Beraneks thus found were related to Jan's father, Vaclav.

      Most of the information in this narrative was supplied by Jan and Albina's children, Charles {my grandfather} and Julia, and grandchildren, Mrs. Ella Beranek Travenicek and Mrs. Bessie Musil. To them and all the others whose contributions made this short historical sketch possible, I extend my sincere thanks.

      Cy Klimesh 2597 East Olivera Road Concord, Ca. 94520 31 July 1968.

      JAN BERENEK, was born April 16, 1844, in Bratice, Caslav, Bohemia, was the son of Vaclav Beranek and {first name unknown} Volence, from the village of Podmouky. Vaclav, son of Vaclav, was born in Habry, Caslav, Bohemia. After his marriage in 1840, he moved to Bratice where his wife died about 1857. Jan's father died in 1890, in Saunders County, Nebraska. Jan died on 16 December 1939, also in Saunders county. On 16 April 1868, at Cobb, Wisconsin, he married

      ALBINA VOPALENSKY, born 23 January 1851, near Novy Rychov, Bohemia, the daughter of Frank Vopalensky and Anna Pech. Frank was born 19 January 1819, near Novy Rychov and died 30 April 1906. Anna was born 15 August 1826 and died 30 January 1914. Albina died 11 August 1940, in Ravenna, Nebraska.

      In 1862, Jan and four other children, {Barbara, Mary, Katerina, and Joseph}, accompanied their father to the United States. Family tradition has it that they sailed from Hamburg. The voyage, which took about six weeks, was aboard one of the combination steam-sail ships which plied the seas for several decades during the transistion from sail to steam. Landing at Baltimore, they made their way to Wisconsin, and settled in the Blue River Valley, near Cobb, in Grant Co.

      Previously, other Czech families had settled there. Among these were Frank and Anne Vopalensky who came in 1861 with five of their children, {Albina, Mary, Anna, Frank and Christina}. The Vopalenskys had also disembarked at Baltimore, after a long and difficult three months between the decks of a sailing ship. During the stormy voyage, in which the ship had been blown far off course, Frank, who was a miller by trade, often wondered just how wise it had been to turn his back on the relative security of the mill which had been in the family for over two hundred years, and set out on a dangerous journey for an unknown future in America.

      Shortly after Jan and Albina's marriage, several young men of their acquaintance ventured into Nebraska. They reported back of the wonderful opportunities there, stressing the fact that the land appeared very fertile, and best of all, being open prairie, did not have to be cleared of trees and brush prior to plowing. This especially appealed to Jan, who had acquired an eighty acre hilly tract of timberland, and was spending long, grueling days at the back breaking task of felling trees, burning them, and grubbing out the brush and stumps. It was slow, hard, work, but the only way in which a man of limited means could obtain a farm in south eastern Wisconsin.

      Jan and Albina weighed the sum their cleared 80 acres would bring, the many months of hard work it would take to add additional acreage to their farm, and their lack of cash with which to buy much needed equipment and goods, as well as minor comforts, against a prairie homestead in Nebraska. It did not take them long to reach their decision. In the spring of 1870 they sold their farm for $1000.00, packed a few things, and with their infant son Frank, boarded by train to Fremont. Here Jan was advised to look further west, in the North Bend area. "The land north of the Platte River was swampy and Jan could not walk to the higher lands further north because water would have filled his boots. Crossing the Platte River by ferry, he walked south. After leaving the river bottoms he found moderately rolling land."

      Guided by the marked surveyor's stakes, Jan selected 80 acres located in Saunders Co., township 17, range 16, about 3 1/2 miles south of North Bend. This parcel especially appealed to him because of the small brook which ran across one edge. Having made his choice, he filed for it under the Homestead Act of 1862. This provided that after payment of a $14.00 filing fee, he would improve, cultivate and live upon the public land for five years, after which time he would be given title. The deed Jan eventually recieved was signed by President U.S. Grant.

      For a short period of time, while Jan was building their house, the Beraneks lived with a neighbor, Frank Beznoska, whose homestead was about 1 3/4 miles to the east. Although settlers had been moving into Saunders county since 1867, sections of it were relatively uninhabited. The 1870 fereral cenus, taken 20 June, shows that the township in which they settled had but one family for every four square miles of area. Jan and Albina {the census record shows the name as "Josephine"} are listed as having real estate valued at $250.00 and personal property at $ 300.00. Intitially their postal address was Linwood, later Cedar Hill, and finally Morse Bluff.

      Since one of the stipulations of the Homestead Act was that land acquisition under its provisions was restricted to citizens, Jan also applied for citizenship. On 26 April 1876, witnessed by Clerk of Disrict Court F.V. Stratton and Sheriff J.W. Moore, Jan Beranek stood before Judge G.W. Post. He renounced his loyalty to the Emperor of Austria, swore allegiance to the United States, and walked out of the Saunders County Court House at Wahoo, a newly made citizen of his adopted country.

      After becomimg established, Jan acquired additional land. On June 20, 1873, he purchased 40 acres at a cost of $ 280.00 and on 28 February 1883, another 40 acres for $400.00. Both of these parcels were "school land" in section 36, which had been granted by the federal government to the state with the condition that income from the rent or sale of these lands would be used for the educational fund. The deeds were signed by the governor of Nebraska.

      Unlike many of the Nebraska pioneers whose lack of funds forced them to live temporarily in either a soddy or a dugout, often with only oiled skins to serve as doors and windows, Jan and Albina's first home was a frame hut...a single room plus attic. The money they had recieved from the sale of their Wisconsin farm permitted the purchase of oxen and a wagon, tools needed to start cottonwood trees growing there and sawed at a neary mill, provided the lumber for the house, a barn, and a chicken coop.

      About 1884 Jan hauled cottonwood logs from the Platte River for use in the construction of a larger house. Though the attic bedroom of this 16 x 20 foot, one story log cabin remained unfinished, the interior below was plastered and wainscoated, and the exterior covered with board siding. The roof sheating was of cottonwood boards, some as much as 24 inches wide. The grandchildren remember the house as being very snug and warm, and with fondness mention the window sills which were deep and wide and ideal for a child to sit in. A fruit cellar, reached through a trapdoor in the floor, was located beneath the pantry. About 1889, a 16 x 8 foot lean-to bedroom. and a 14 x 16 foot frame kitchen were added. This home served the family until 1917, when Jan's son Charles {my grandfather} razed it to make room for a modern one. The original small hut, which had been converted into a tool shed, remained standing until it's destruction in 1962.

      Albina enjoyed plants and flowers and soon had a variety growing about the house and yard. In addition to some of the old fashioned favorites, such as hollyhocks, geraniums, fushias, myrtle, and Harrison's yellow roses which she started from seed or cuttings brought from Wisconsin, she transplanted columbines and other native species which grew in fields and along the sparsely timbered steams. Many of the plants were utilitarian as well as ornamental. Meditererranean squill served as a pack for curing open sores; camomile blossoms were dired to be used as tea and in cough syrup. Ther were also rhubarb and horse radish, as well as apple trees and Concord grape vines. In Wisconsin Jan haad had to clear away trees to have open land...here to provide shade, he had to plant them. Some of the cottonwoods, red maples, birch and American elms that he planted still survive.

      There were no roads of fences at first. When walking to visit a neighbor or driving the oxen to market for supplies the Beraneks, as did all the settlers, took the path of least resistance, cross country. When roads were eventually built, many of them followed the trails thus made. In 1870, Wahoo, the county seat and the only "town" in the county, consisted of but two buildings. To have their grain milled, the Beraneks drove their oxen to Ashland, a trip that required a week. A round trip to Fremont, across the Platte River, to sell their produce and buy supplies, took two to three days. Prior to the building of the bridge, the river was crossed by means of a raft. If the river was high or turbulent, or the weather windy or stormy, the ferrymen would refuse to risk a crossing. The travelers would then either have to wait it out on the river bank or return home to try again at a later date.

      In those early days, comforts and conveniences were all but unknown. The family's efforts were directed, almost totally, towards production of food and shelter. Because of the difficulty and slowness of plowing the deep, heavy sod, only a small amount of grain was planted during 1870. Some of the first corn was "sod corn", so called because it was planted without plowing by striking an axe into virgin ground, and dropping the seed into the hole thus made. In later years corn was still planted by hand, with the help of a little pointed gadget which when pushed into the plowed soil would release one kernel at a time. The whole family, even the small children, perticipated in this slow task, as they did in many others.

      Living conditions were relatively primitive. Food was all home grown. Cooking was done in quantity. Kitchen fats were salvaged to be used for light at night, and for making soap. The children sat on the floor around a large bowl and ate directly from it. In the late winter the kitchen was shared by one or more setting hens, installed on nests behind the stove.

      Makeup and cosmetics were totally non-existent, though it must be said, the ladies did try. The story is told how one year during threshing time, the Beranek girls had rubbed their chheks with elm leaves in an effort to make them glow. The immediate effort was most gratirying and the girls served on table with rosy cheeks. The following day however, it was another story. To their horror, the girls discovered that they had rubbed too hard, and their cheeks had became scabbed. Table waiters were a little scare on that and the following days.

      The youngsters slept on the attic floor. During the hot summer nights the boys moved out into the open, or into the haymow or granary. Straw pallets served as mattresses. This was unlike the soft, billowy feather beds which Albina had enjoyed as a child and which in Bohemia were a must in every bride's hope chest. Albina told how as a little girl she herded geese for the nobleman of the district. As her pay, she was permitted to pick and keep any feathers that the geese might drop.

      Indians were encountered frequently. Though not hostile, they did, never the less, cause apprehension whenever one or more of them stopped at the door to demand food.

      With the years Jan and Albina learned that the land which had held such promise and at times rewarded their labors with abundant crops, could at other times be extremely cruel. Specific years were vividly remembered and often mentioned in their late years because of the tragedy or abnormal hardships and suffering which had occured.

      Their first big setback came in 1874. Just before harvest time, clouds of grasshoppers, so numerous that the sum was obscured, decended upon the area, devastating it. Some of the insects, brown and slate in color with a white underside, were as much as three inches long. Plants were defoliated or devoured very few escaped. The oat fields looked like inverted whisk brooms. The ground was almost completely denuded and crop destruction was total. Even the siding of the house and the wooden handles of farm tools were attacked. The sound of their ravenous chewing, amplified by the enormous numbers, created a peculiar hum in the air. Across the Platte River, they were so thick on the Union Pacific tracks that the train was stalled for three hours, unable to proceed because of the slippery mess of crushed insects on the rails. After two or three days, when the insects finally left, the land was strangely silent. Although grasshoppers were a problem in other years, they had never been as bad as in 1874. Only the state help which followed, in the form of food and clothing, enabled the Beraneks and their neighbors to remain on the farms and survuve during the following year until another crop could be raised.

      1888 was remembered as the year of the big blizzard. "Shortly after noon, on a day in January, Albina Beranek was feeding he son Charles, {my grandpa} when she was alarmed by the cows galloping home with clanging bells. Rushing outside to investigate what had frightened them, she saw turbulent black clouds building rapidly in the north. It had started out as a warm day, but now the temperature was dropping swiftly. The heavy snow which soon was falling rapidly, was accompanied by a rising wind. The older boys, Frank and Jim, and possibly John, were at what was known as "Racek's" school, about 2 1/2 miles distant. Jan mounted a horse and rode to his brother Joseph's place, a mile from the school, where he found that Joseph had managed to bring the children to his home. Leaving the boys and his own horse at his brother's place, Jan walked home, groping his way along the fence lines, his eyes plastered with blowing, freezing snow, By evening, a foot of snow had fallen, and the temperature had dropped to 20 degrees below zero. All the Beraneks were safe, but others were not so fortunate. The Malloy family's hired man went for the children in a sleigh. Losing his way home, he turned the mules loose, tipped the sleigh over, and scooped away the snow. He and the children huddled under it, saving their lives. His feet and hands were badly frozen and he was permanently crippled. Near North Bend two sisters, 8 and 12 years old were lost. The older one wrapped her coat about her sister, putting her arms around her. They were found frozen this way."

      With the limited shelter which the pioneer had for himself and his livestock, the blizzards were always a hardship. This one was probably not much more severe than many others...it had brought tragedy to some of the settlers because of the suddenness with which it had come. Sometimes these stroms had {by later evaluation} their comic aspects. On one occassion a neighbor who did not have a barn for his stock and was fearful for their safety, brought them into his house: " We had two oxen, all we had, and they had been for almost two days snowed in by the strawpile. What to do? How could we do without them, if they froze? It was not pleasant but there was no other alternative."

      Towards the end of July 1894 and again in 1895, disaster came in the form of very hot winds which burned the corn crop when it was about to polinate. One year no corn was harvested, the next only about ten bushels. Seed corn for the following year was extremely difficult to get, and people had to travel long distances to find any. Fortunately, the oat and wheat crops were not effected, and the harvest of these grains was good.

      Tragedy struck the family in 1897 when on 2 July, their 10 year old daughter Mary, unexpectedly died. Death was believed to have resulted from some sort of poisonous sting on her temple, suffered while swimming in the farm pond.

      Hardships shared in common pull some people together...others it draws apart. With the Beraneks it was the latter. In April 1903, after thirty five years of marriage, apparently as a result of conditions which had been generated or aggravated by ill health, Jan obtained a divorce. Albina left the homesteas and moved to another farm about nine miles east of Ravenna, taking their three youngest children with her. Eighteen year old Charles stayed on the farm with his father.

      About six feet tall, Jan had hazel eyes, was color blind {red and green}, and had a beard that tended to be on the red side. He had a very strong voice which carried far. When working in the field he would call home: "Bring me water!" and the boys had to hear him. He had a good singing voice; even when past 80 years of age, though his voice was now quavery and uncertain, he could still carry a tune.

      Jan eventually remarried, turned the farm over to his son Charles, {my grandpa} and moved into Morse Bluff. When in 1929 a fire, believed to have been caused by an overheated or faulty chimney, destored their home, he and his wife Caroline live for a few weeks with Charles's family, until another house in Morse Bluff could be acquired. At the time of his death, Jan was back on the farm, having returned there after Caroline's death a few years earlier.

      Not finished yet to be continued, Jan Soukup Joyce

    Custom ID Vopalensky F6sp, Beranek V13 
    Buried 1939  CEMETERY Czech National Killian Cemetery, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Died 16 Dec 1939  Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I950  Czech
    Last Modified 1 Mar 2014 

    Father Vaclav Beranek,   b. 1810, Krupa #16, Bykan, Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1890, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years) 
    Mother Anna M Volenec,   b. 1817, Podmoky #15, Podmoky, Havlickuv Brod, Vysocina, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1862, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age < 44 years) 
    Married 9 Feb 1836  Caslav, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F792  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Albina Vopalensky,   b. 23 Jan 1851, Novy Rychnov #98, Novy Rychnov, Pelhrimov, Vysocina, Czech Republic Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Aug 1940, Ravenna, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Married 16 Apr 1868  Cobb, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Divorced
    • Divorced
    Marriage Status Divorced 
    Children 
     1. Evelyn Beranek,   b. 1868, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1868, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    +2. Frank Beranek,   b. 11 Aug 1869, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1941, Ravenna, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    +3. James Beranek,   b. 9 Nov 1873, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jun 1953, Cresco, Howard County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    +4. John B Beranek,   b. 10 Oct 1876, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jun 1967, Ord, Valley County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
    +5. Amelia Beranek,   b. 9 May 1878, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Oct 1962, Ravenna, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
    +6. Anna Beranek,   b. 5 Dec 1879, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jan 1944, Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     7. Henry Beranek,   b. 19 Sep 1881, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jan 1953  (Age 71 years)
     8. William Beranek,   b. 14 May 1883, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1973, Kearney, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
    +9. Charles Beranek,   b. 31 May 1885, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jul 1979, North Bend, Dodge County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)
     10. Mary Beranek,   b. 18 Jun 1887, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jul 1897, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 10 years)
     11. Louis Beranek,   b. 26 Apr 1889, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 1972, Ravenna, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    +12. Julia Beranek,   b. 28 Nov 1892, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jan 1973, Ravenna, Buffalo County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    Last Modified 18 Oct 2012 
    Family ID F347  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Karolina Jasa,   b. 1860,   d. Bef 1939  (Age < 78 years) 
    Married 24 Apr 1904  Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 4 Jul 2012 
    Family ID F5133  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 16 Apr 1844 - Bratcice #54, Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMigration - 1863 - Bratcice, Bratcice, Kutna Hora, Stredocesky, Czech Republic Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 16 Apr 1868 - Cobb, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1870 US Census - 1870 - Township 17, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1880 US Census - 1880 - Douglas, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1900 US Census - 1900 - Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Apr 1904 - Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1910 US Census - 1910 - Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1920 US Census - 1920 - Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google Maps1930 US Census - 1930 - Bohemia, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeath Civil State - 1939 - Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 1939 - CEMETERY Czech National Killian Cemetery, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 16 Dec 1939 - Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Histories
    Bo_1983_SaundersCountyNebraska_BeranekHakelKavanVopalensky
    Bo_1983_SaundersCountyNebraska_BeranekHakelKavanVopalensky

  • Sources 
    1. [S204] RESEARCHER (Czech) - ANCESTOR - Maresh, Richard (3003) - Vopalensky, Frank (196), Maresh, Richard.

    2. [S207] RESEARCHER (Czech) - ANCESTOR - Klimesh, Cyril M (wife 's ancestor) (967) - Vopalensky, Frank (196), Klimesh, Cyril M.

    3. [S352] CENSUS USA 1870.

    4. [S354] CENSUS USA 1880.

    5. [S353] CENSUS USA 1900.

    6. [S349] CENSUS USA 1910.

    7. [S350] CENSUS USA 1920.

    8. [S351] CENSUS USA 1930.

    9. [S238] STATE INDEX Death - Nebraska - Not Indexed.

    10. [S93] CEMETERY Czech National Killian Cemetery, Morse Bluff, Saunders County, Nebraska, USA.